non-interference engine

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I was looking at a 2006 Honda Civic and I asked the saleman if the engine was a Non-interference engine and I got a blank look So guys help me out here...is it or isn't it!....Thanks

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Michael Rose wrote:

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Why would it matter if it is or it isn't?
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Very simple....if it is a non-interference engine and your timing belt or chain breaks it doesn't hurt the engine....

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In all my years, I've spun more bearings (2) than I've ever broken a timing chain (0), or belt for that matter.
Again, why would it matter if it is or it isn't? Do you plan on not maintaining your vehicle after you purchase it?
Steve

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valve crash. Usually that comes from water pump failure if the water pump is driven by the timing belt. In that respect chain driven engines are "safer."
Mike
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Michael Rose wrote:

if you maintain the engine as it's supposed to be, this will *never* be an issue. you run more danger of wheel bolts fatiguing than you do having a belt/chain break on a properly maintained engine. and get some perspective on cost/benefit of failure vs. performance/economy of interference engines.
come to think of it, this thread smells of fud.

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Michael Rose wrote:

I don't know, but it doesn't matter because the engine uses a timing chain instead of a belt.
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High Tech Misfit wrote:

Don't count on it "not mattering" for that... my old GLC died a messy death when an improperly-adjusted timing chain slipped a tooth.
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wrote:

I think it is more a question of good engineering vs. bad engineering. Saturn owners have a lot more problems with the chains than Honda owners have with the belts. Ironic, as the Saturn dealers pitched the chain as being superior to Honda's belts.
We will see if these new Honda chain engines can routinely go 200K on the original chains. I am assuming that a chain replacement will end up costing twice as much as a belt.
Also, how hard is it to change the water pump in these cars? Do you have to remove the chain?
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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 23:51:14 GMT, Gordon McGrew wrote:

The salesman that sold me my 06 Si said that it was a timing belt, and the scheduled maintenance for it was 100K. Is that incorrect?
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Joe LaVigne wrote:

It is incorrect. It uses a timing chain.
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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 08:22:47 -0400, High Tech Misfit wrote:

Thanks.
Does this mean that there is no scheduled maintenance for the chain?
If so, it looks like just fluids, brakes and 100K tune-ups. Not bad for maintenance costs...
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Joe LaVigne wrote:

--------------------------------
The 06 Si comes with a FINE manual. Read The Fine Manual.
Read this too, regarding the 'art' of car salesmanship. It's LONG: http://www.edmunds.com/advice/buying/articles/42962/article.html
'Curly'
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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 09:11:55 -0600, 'Curly Q. Links' wrote:

The manual doesn't mention the timing belt or chain at all, so far as I can tell.
I have never expected a salesman to be extremely knowledgeable about cars. It really isn't their job. That article is pretty good, but to be honest, this was my first time at a Honda dealership, and the salesan was the best auto salesman I have ever dealt with (from a buyers point of view). Didn't push anything, was helpful in every respect.
I wasn't able to bring the price down, but I didn't expect to considering it was a Civic Si in a year where they were named car of the year, and the Si has had so many favorable reviews. They don't last long at sticker, and true to my expectations, when I tried to negotiate a better price, they were more than willing to walk away from the sale.
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On Thu, 17 Aug 2006 03:37:04 -0400, Joe LaVigne

Of course it is their job. It's just easier to guess or make stuff up.
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2006 21:04:56 GMT, Gordon McGrew wrote:

That depends on the technicality of the questions.
Salesmen are not mechanics. A good salesman will often have you wait while he gets the answer for you, but there are very few of those in the world. Especially with the fear that you'll leave while waiting, or consider their need to seek help a problem.
In my industry (server/networking engineer), we find this all the time. Our salespeople often sell things that are damned near ridiculous, and rely on us to make it happen. We try to make them better, but the allure of the almighty buck is a great barrier.
As I said, this was the best sales experience I have ever had. And Honda's always had a belt before. So his not knowing off-hand about a single technical change, from a sales standpoint, is inconsequential. Especially since he got the sale, anyhow... ;-)
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IMHO chains have not proven themselves much more reliable than belts. Maybe they have improved, but the last car I had with a chain (an 84 Dodge with a Mitsu engine) didn't make it 100K miles before the chain was worn enough to jump. The first step in replacement was: remove engine from car.
Mike
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Depends on the engine design. Certain cars were notorious for eating timing chains. The Nissan Axxess had one such. On the the opposite side, the old Toyota timing chains were very well designed. They'd wear and get noisy, but never break or jump.
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TeGGeR

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Michael Pardee wrote:

Toyota 4-cylinders have been chain-driven since the late 90s (starting with the '98 Corolla I believe), and I am not aware of any chain-related failures in properly maintained cars. Nissan was using chains long before that, although I don't know how reliable they have been.
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