Coasting

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Hello, I have been reading up on hypermiling, a technique that employs some very common sense ways to increase mileage. But it also involves turning off the engine and coasting, something I do not think is wise,
due to the loss of power steering and power brakes. I have a 2003 Accent, manual transmission. Does it do any harm to put the car in neutral and coast with the engine still running at idle? Thanks
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It seems like I read in Car and Driver magazine, in one of the editorials or car articles a few months back, that they just mentioned in passing that they found no difference in mileage doing this. The article was about something else but related. Just fyi.
Maybe because if you're foot's off the gas, no matter what the rpm says, the same amount of gas is being injected for 'idle' speed. The cylinders are just moving faster in gear because the wheels are turning faster, the engine isn't compensating by giving(wasting) more gas to keep up. But it sounds like it because engine rpm is still engine rpm, with all the associated sounds, whirrs, hums, roars, etc. regardless of how much gas is incoming. Seems logical.
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There'd be no threat of damage to the car. Most jurisdictions, however, make it illegal to have the transmission in neutral or the clutch disengaged when crossing railroad at least in certain circumstances.
At the very least, no noticeable difference in fuel economy is a plausible finding. When coasting with the car in gear, as long as the engine is turning at idle rpm, you have engine braking, but the ECM cuts all fuel to the engine (since it isn't needed). On the other hand, with the car in neutral, you don't have the engine braking, but you're using the necessary gas to keep the engine running.
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On Tue, 01 Jul 2008 10:38:34 -0500, "hyundaitech"

i was going to say what hyundaitech said. I'll add this. There is a lot of "old wisdom" floating around that came from the days of carburated engines that often used more gas at idle than driving slowly. If you are coasting down a hill then you need the engin braking unless you can safely let the car accelerate down the hill for a long period of time. Short bursts won't buy you enough gas saving to matter and can be offset by brake wear. If you are city driving you will find anticipating lights and developing a smooth driving practice is most productive. For highway driving cruise control is your friend.
My $.02, worth every penny you paid for it. ;-)
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I agree with what has been said in this thread thus far, but I have a puzzling question: Why do I get better gas mileage using neutral on my 2006 Sonata V6 ATX?
Here's my case and maybe something is wrong with my car, but I doubt it.
Same exact stretch of road near my work has a very long (about a mile) with a mild grade. I'd guess about 3-4% or so. Nothing major.
I approach the top of the incline (start of descent) at exactly 45 MPH. Keeping the car in "D", with my foot completely off the gas, I am doing 46 MPH at the bottom of the hill. Putting the car in neutral has me going 56 MPH at the end of the incline.
Why? Should there really be that much engine breaking, or is this transmission drag?
Eric
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On Tue, 01 Jul 2008 23:37:34 GMT, "Eric G."

Probably normal torque converter drag.
There's another kind of "coasting" that definitely saves fuel. Simply getting off the gas a little earlier when making stops can save fuel and brake pads. I see a lot of people doing 75mph get on their brakes without first coasting down to a reasonable speed. I don't have any figures, but that must be very wasteful. -
Bob
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wrote:

Yeah, Bob, that's what I figured too. I just think this car could get so much better mileage overall with much less of that drag.
And your 100% right about the braking. Actually, it all goes to the overall smoothness of the ride. The less g's your pull, either positive or negative, from accelerating or braking, will improve your mileage. The lateral g's in a turn don't effect mileage as much, but if you are scrubbing off speed it will.
Eric
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Eric G. wrote:

This is true with respect to stopping, but not with respect to acceleration. The is an optimal acceleration curve that will maximize fuel economy. Most cars get optimum economy in the 40-50 MPH range. Driving too long at speeds less than that will cause a lose in overall economy. So, you generaly want to accelerate smoothly to at least 40 MPH. You don't want to floor it to be sure, but taking two miles to accelerate to 55 MPH will take more fuel than a more reasonable acceleration that gets the car into the "sweet zone" sooner and keeps it there longer.
Matt
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Matt Whiting wrote: <snip>

Interesting! I'd like to know *why*. Is it from being in a higher gear?
    And a related question I've wondered about for some time: I often get stuck behind people who accelerate so *slowly* I want to scream. I'm guessing these people are subscribing to the "drive like you have an egg between your foot and the gas pedal" school of driving.
    I'm sure this was reasonable advice back in the day when stomping the accelerator pumped large amounts of gas down the carb throat, but how much difference does it make with FI cars?
    Sure, it's going to take a little more gas to accelerate at a reasonable rate than just gathering inertia, but enough to make an appreciable difference in MPG?
    My peeve is that such drivers, IMHO, contribute to traffic congestion by leaving the "backed up" cars behind them to sit a traffic lights they would have "made" otherwise, etc. Which doesn't do anything for *their* gas milage.
    Please note I'm not talking about peeling rubber or "jackrabbit" starts, just no-nonsense, "get 'er done" starts.
--
PB
"I suspect you're an arrogant little pissant who grew up in the
Red Bull generation." - CJW
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Plague Boy wrote:

Yes.
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Too bad. You can swear and pound on the steering wheel all you want but you don't own the road.

Most tests say 4-5%, some quite a bit higher. Combine that with other gas saving measure and it could amount to over 30% according to the Edmund's test.

Yes.
Your comment is complete speculation unless you know how the lights are timed. Someone somewhere down the line is not going to make the light no matter what the conditions.Sorry you're annoyed with people that don't drive like 'you' think they should drive. Take a deep breath and try and calm down, your attitude could lead to road rage with all its dire consequences.
L.

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Curlyque wrote: your attitude could lead to road rage

No question about the road rage. My Brother in law, a state trooper, said that out of all the incidents of road rage he's dealt with, the driver that got the ticket said the same things. The person in front was blocking traffic, and, or driving too slow in the left lane. The slow drivers comment: He doesn't own the road.
The unfortunate thing is, slow drivers don't get it either, they think everyone should follow their lead, but they are the ones causing the irritation.
If you want to drive slow be courteous and allow others to get by, and don't drive in the left lane. If you want to drive fast, be patient, NOT aggressive, and pass on the LEFT.
Clay
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Those aren't my feelings, but I do feel that the less aggresive driver should have the right of way, not the other way around, especially since the topic is saving resources. It's just the way it plays out. No matter how slow one goes, there is always someone slower. No matter how fast one goes there is always someone who wants to drive faster. Each driving situation calls for a separate evaluation and action.
JMHO
L.
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Curlyque wrote:

What it boils down to is that you consider someone driving faster than you "aggressive".
I say I won't ride your ass, ever, if your in the right hand lane. If you are in the left lane I expect you to move over at your first opportunity, when you see a faster driver behind you. It's called driving etiquette.
This is the way drivers around the world behave. Everyone is welcome to save fuel all they want, just don't force me to do it.
Clay
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How does being the faster of two drivers equate to being more aggresive? Being more urgent in life has nothing to do with aggression.

Of course, but as was stated, as often as genuinely aggressive drivers pose problems, so do those who sputter along with the attitude that this is fast enough, and everyone else around me should be satisfied at this pace. There is a reason that most states have laws about obstructing the flow of traffic. To quote a phrase, "especially since the topic is saving resources".
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Curlyque wrote:

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I wasn't speaking exclusively about interstate driving. What is your version of driving etiquette if I'm doing the speed limit, or slightly under, on a two lane road? I have calculated that I get the best mileage at 53/54 with the car I drive most often. If you push me to go faster you're costing me money. What about driving on city streets which will likely soon be carrying more scooter and bicycle traffic? Where do your rights end and mine begin?
And yes, I completely agree that 'going with the flow' on a busy, multi-lane limited access road, is the safest way to drive.
L.
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Curlyque wrote:

I have no problem if you are going the speed limit on a two lane road nor do I have a problem if you are going the speed limit while passing on the interstate. I do have a problem, if you are cruising in the left hand lane at, or below, the speed limit and not passing, or do not move over to allow others to pass because there is a slower moving vehicle in the distance (being a relative term but generally taking more than a minute or two to overtake).
As far as bicycles (scooters should be able to keep up with the flow of most urban traffic) go the law states that a cyclist has the same rights as a motorist. Being a cyclist myself and realizing that I may have the same rights as a motorist there are certain streets in my city that, in my estimation, are dangerous to exercise those rights. When there are curb cuts in the sidewalk I will opt to ride on the sidewalk rather than try to ride up a hill on a street where traffic is heavy and and the lanes are narrow. I would do this not out of etiquette but more importantly out of a need for survival and common sense. Just because you have the right does not mean that you should insist on that right to the detriment of your well-being. After having several fellow cyclist get hit by vehicles I realize that the 2000#+ always win whether they are right or not.
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This, in Illinois, is illegal (with some reasonable exceptions) and can get you a ticket if there are cars behind you trying to pass.
Anyone driving faster than me is a maniac; anyone driving slower than me is an idiot. ;-)
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