obd2 code reader

would this code reader work for our 99 accent??
http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&categoryC989&itemE64286263&rd=1

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I'm not sure about fuel management systems in other countries. If you have a diagnostic connector shaped like the one in the ad-- it'll probably be in the dash just above the little cubby box on the left side, you may need to get down and look up to see it-- your car would appear to be OBD-II compliant and this code reader would be designed to work with it. Some vehicles have difficulty communicating with some tools, so experiences may vary.
The tool in the ad isn't a very sophisticated tool. According to the ad, it'll read and clear codes only. I would presume it won't give you any data readings (e.g. coolant temp) or other information. The manual may be vague. Codes of the form P0xxx are predetermined but codes with P1xxx or P2xxx are manufacturer specific. Without seeing the manual, I have no way of knowing whether it has the information to tell you that P1128 is a partial load lean condition, for example.
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hyundaitech wrote:

Since I've recently futzed with two different code readers, I'll comment. This product should read your car. I'd expect that any code stored in your car's computer should be downloaded to the display with no trouble. Don't worry if the Hyundai codes aren't in the manufacturer's literature: you can just print out the code list from the Hyundai tech web site.
One issue, however, is the fit between the plug/socket. There can be a minute difference in the sizes of these plugs -- so much force can be required to remove one that's not a good match that I can conceive of the user damaging the connector on the car -- and I'll leave it to you to imagine the cost of a dealer repair to replace the factory connector with associated cabling, etc.
I'm fairly pleased with the Innova/Equus code reader that I wound up with. It handles nicely (no insane menu structure). They sent me a replacement cable that fits the car better than the first one (but still not perfectly). These seem to always be "on sale" for $100 (after rebate) at Kragen and probably affiliated stores.
As Hyundaitech has implied, these tools will show the basic codes. They are not the professional's costly scan tools -- these instruments pull down much more specific information from the car's computer describing very precise performance data. A code reader won't do that. However, I believe that it is very useful to have one because it will tell you whether the Check Engine light means that your motor will blow up in 30 seconds or whether you can continue to drive for 6 months until you can get a repair at your convenience. In other words, it'll definitely zero you in on the bad system or part. And very often, that's all you need.
It can help, too, to keep the transaction honest between you and a flaky mechanic when you're far from home. I believe that most mechanics are honest, by the way.
Richard
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