What tools do I need?

I have recently put on an adjustable rear track bar on my 4" lifted TJ, and
had to take off my upper rear adjustable control arms to get some other
stuff adjusted. When they were off a friend who was watching/helping
screwed them all the way down so now I'm having to find the sweet spot all
over again for my pinion angle.
The problem is, I just can't seem to find it anymore. I eyeballed it last
time and there was a slight shake at 65mph, but now I just can't find where
they need to be. So I'm gonna get the angle tools to do it, but I'm not
sure which kind I need. An angle finder of some sort I'm sure, but if
anyone out there can tell me what to go buy so I can measure my angles and
get everything done perfectly I would be happy! I'm tired of crawling
under, adjusting, crawling up, opening the gate to the yard, test driving,
opening the gate again, crawling under, etc etc etc.
Troy
Reply to
Troy
Simple angle finder with a magnetic base and a tape measure.
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The trick is to get both upper links exactly the same length and keep the proper shaft angle while keeping the rear axle parallel to the front. You should be able to get close enough by measuring the links from center bolt to center bolt.
Reply to
DougW
Remember that if you have a CV rear driveshaft with a slipjoint, the pinion should be at the same angle as the driveshaft. If you have the stock slipyoke (not recommended with a 4" lift) the pinion should be parallel with the output shaft.
And that friend now owes you a 12-pack.
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Reply to
Matt Macchiarolo
Ok thats simple enough. I'll have to tackle it after the weekend, but I'll let you know how it went. Thanks!
Troy
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Reply to
Troy
Yeah, I have the cv driveshaft with a slipjoint. Recently rebuilt from a previous problem so I'm miffed about having vibes again. So the pinion should be pretty much straight in line with the driveshaft eh? I'll go eyeball it one more time for today.
I read somewhere on a website about having it 1 degree lowered for axle wrap, but I'm sure I wont be able to judge a degree until I get the angle finder huh... I wish I had more time today to mess with it but I gotta be asleep by 7:30 to be up for work at 3am. ugh.
Ah and that "friend" heh heh, does owe me some beer now. He thinks he did something major wrong to my baby, I haven't told him its a minor thing yet, just letting him sweat it out for a day.
Troy
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Reply to
Troy
Major pain anyway.... ;-)
Figure how soft the suspension is and how much a full tank of gas and/or passengers lowers the suspension for your angle.
Mine really doesn't like to run empty and door ant topless, it will vibrate on the highway. With a load like for camping or vacationing or in the winter with the hardtop and hard doors on it runs really smooth.
Mike 86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00 88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's Canadian Off Road Trips Photos: Non members can still view! Jan/06
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(More Off Road album links at bottom of the view page)
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Reply to
Mike Romain
By the way, there is no axle wrap with link suspension, only with leaf springs. That's why they make traction and ladder bars. If your getting axle wrap with a link suspension then the bushings are toast.
Once the angle is set, the four links maintain that angle. (within reason)
Anyhoo..
You should start with a full tank of fuel and no cargo on flat ground (concrete) not on grass/gravel/or dirt.
To measure the angle you place the angle finder on the output yolks ear. i.e. side closest to the transmission case and side closest to the diff. You measure one ear, rotate the shaft 180, measure the other ear, and take the difference. Make sure the bearing cap is flat or you will get an off reading.
The difference between front and rear should be no greater than 1.5 degrees.
As for +1 offset, I dunno. My ZJ is bone stock and it reads about .5 high at the rear on a full tank.
Reply to
DougW
Heh... I forgot..
This is hard to do without a frame/axle lift under the Jeep. You probably could get away with using just one of the ears, but taking an average of the two is more accurate.
I've done it by moving the ZJ by hand. (not recommended) The garage door and tool box would keep the zj from running me over. Since it was in 4wheel N. O_o Play it safe and have someone (you trust) help you.
Reply to
DougW
Show the wife this list:
Laser angle finder (to help align it) Hydraulic vehicle hoist (to safely suspend the Jeep) Giant air compressor (to tighten those bolts) Every socket and driver availible at sears (you just never know) Sawzall, Skillsaw, 40ton shop press, lathe, drill press, band saw, and a 220V Welder.
;-)
Actually, a magnetized angle finder will get the job done.
HTH,
Carl
Reply to
Carl
Hi Doug, Thanks for adding the disclaimer: (within Reason) because there's no comparison with what we call a ladder bars:
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and your suspension used onthe boats of 1959:
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God Bless America, Bill O|||||||Omailto: snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
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Reply to
L.W.(Bill) Hughes III
One more thing before I start...
The rear adjustable track bar, should I be setting the rear end where it is evenly under the jeep, as in the tires are both poking out the same distance from the sides or am I straightening the driveshaft when viewed from below? I notice that the pinion is a bit offset from center on the rear end and dont know if too much angle there could be causing some vibes...
Oh I found an angle finder at home depot for $7.00, woohoo!
Troy
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Reply to
Troy
offset is fine, just as long as the angles are the same.
The control arms need to be riding properly with the vehicle on level ground and a full fuel tank. I'd probably measure the axle to frame at a couple of points then try to duplicate those with the new track bar, but since your lifting it might be better to use a plumb bob from a point on the frame to a mark on the axle. Remember to mark with some tape or a pen should the plumb bob fall off. I find a lead fishing weight and one of those powerful little magnets work fine. Although you could just tape the line to the underside or hang it off a frame member.
Reply to
DougW
Ok cool. I adjusted it today to pretty close, within 2 degrees of being straight, and it felt a lot better. The only way I can tell something is vibrating is when looking at the mirrors.
Eyeballing it, I was waaaay off! I don't know how I did it before but it must have been one lucky guess.
Thanks for the suggestions, I will measure and check everything out tomorrow and let ya'll know how it went.
Troy
Reply to
Troy

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