Has “Punctureseal” gone belly up?

Having stuffed this stuff in my motorhome tyres and my car tyres (which has no spare) and “fixed” a puncture in my wife’s car, I’m kinda enjoying the
extra level of insurance against punctures it’s giving me.
Unfortunately my car needs two new tyres and when I went to the website, the link is bust. I know that that are resellers on Amazon but if possible I would like to order the 18.9L pail size which nobody seems to do.
Maybe it’s just a website problem as it’s only the home page that seems to be affected.
Tim
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On 14/06/2018 21:24, Tim+ wrote:

The site works for me but how many cars do you have? 18.9L does 7 to 11 cars! They also do 2.6L @ £70 and 4.6L @ £114
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Well, we have three vehicles and my daughters have a car each and if the dosing cost comes down by buying in larger quantities is seems a no-brained to buy in bulk.
Tim
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On 14/06/2018 22:16, Tim+ wrote:

When was the last time you got a puncture?
Tempting fate I know but it is years since I last had a puncture. I am even getting to the stage when I think it would be no big deal to drive around with no spare at all (I currently have a full size spare).
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Had two near new and very expensive tyres wrecked by wood screws on the last car. Within weeks of one another. And a third which it was possible to repair.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 15/06/2018 10:10, Dave Plowman (News) wrote: <snip> > Had two near new and very expensive tyres wrecked by wood screws on the

From the application of a cordless drill/driver?
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On 15/06/2018 10:33, Robin wrote:

Does sound to be remarkably bad luck otherwise.
Problem on my current car is the rim/wheel seal - apparently that starts to fail after a while. Had them cleaned and been OK - fingers crossed.
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On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 11:13:49 +0100

Around here (East Anglia) potholes are the big tyre killers.
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On 16/06/2018 00:45, Davey wrote:

A the tyres would fail in such a way that any punctureseal gunk would be unlikely to work.
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wrote:

Tyre or rim fail, yes. ;-)
But then you wouldn't want it to work under those circumstances (and because of 'science', it doesn't). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 14/06/2018 21:24, Tim+ wrote:

give them a ring, it looks like the website is unwell
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It is quite reassuring. ;-)

I first came across the concept of a pre-emptive tyre sealant at the BMF (Motorcycle) rally at Peterborough years ago with Ultraseal and used it on many motorbikes, cars and trailers after that (as did many of my fellow motorcyclists and to good effect).
Then I think there was some sort of issue with the directors of the company with one going off and producing his own stuff but still using the Ultraseal brand.
The other, not wanting to get dragged down with the other stuff not being so good, started selling something the same or better than the original Ultraseal as Punctureseal.
I gave a mate half a bottle of Ultraseal to retrospectively fix a puncture on his motorbike tyre and he was so impressed with it he bought some more and even replaced what I had given him with a full bottle of something else (different brand, *possibly* Punctursafe[1]).
I wasn't sure if it was the same stuff but just put it on the shelf and when daughters bf got a puncture on his motorbike and we tried to use this stuff as I had done several times previously to retrospectively seal the puncture. It sorta worked but even after we added more than we should, it continued to leak around the same hole so he ended up putting a new tyre on (it was fairly worn in any case).
Then I did some more research and found that it was Punctureseal that was the replacement for Ultraseal, not whatever my mate had got. ;-(
I have since bought the larger pail of Punctureseal and their dispenser and have treated all our cars and daughters van with it and so far no punctures (but that could just be luck etc).
I have used Punctureseal to retrospectively repair a puncture on one of our untreated cars and it worked as expected (so we did the remaining 3 wheels in any case). ;-)
This is the website of the stuff I use (no connection other than happy customer etc):
http://www.punctureseal.com/
YMMV etc.
Cheers, T i m
[1] I'll see if I still have the container of the questionable stuff (I recovered it from the bike tyre) and confirm the brand name.
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On 15/06/2018 22:42, T i m wrote:

snip

When it comes to tyre change or puncture repair, does it create an expensive mess? It looks quite soluble and easy enough to rinse out - I'm just not that sure how a tyre fitter would react.
Hopefully you don't know the answer :-)
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Done that ...

Puncture repair?? <shrug> ;-)

Nope (partly because of the above and partly because of what follows ..)

It is. I took the 7 year old rear tyre of the Mrs's motorbike that had been Ultrasealed and it just rinsed out with a hose (I rinsed it out because I was putting it away and was going to just use it as 'a tyre' whilst working on the bike before fitting new ones).
I have also transferred some from a fairly freshly installed tyre to it's replacement when someone pinched a hole out of the sidewall on a nearly new tyre against a kerb (couldn't have been an old tyre eh ...). ;-(

Given they just throw them on their heap and the stuff stays in there, I'm not sure they would even notice. ;-)
Remember, this isn't the 'foam' that's likely to fill the entire tyre void, including on the rim etc, this is a gel like liquid that is thrown to the outsides of the tyre (well, the inside of the outside, the back of the tread area <g>) and generally stays there and therefore not found anywhere else (like on the rim or sidewalls etc).

See above. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 16/06/18 21:05, T i m wrote:

I assume the 'stuff' stays liquid(ish) while in the tyre. Then, when you get a puncture, it fills the hole (or around the object etc) and 'goes off' to become rubbery.
Presumably, it is exposure to air that causes the reaction/change in state.
However, there is air in the tyre, quite a volume of it. Some must react with the initial fill of seal, and any top up of air must react with more seal.
I assume the idea is to ensure there is enough liquid left to fill any holes.
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<snip> >I assume the 'stuff' stays liquid(ish) while in the tyre.
Erm, it's weird. I think 'gel' was the best way to describe it once it's been distributed round the inside of the tyre as if you leave a tyre stationary (indefinitely AFAIK), it doesn't all run to the bottom?

I think that the idea yes. ;-)

I think so, plus heat within the tyre etc.

Yes, and hence why it seems to form a very fine skin (that may hold it in place) but of you were to run your finger though it, you wouldn't be able to pull a skin off etc? As I mentioned elsewhere, the stuff that had been in the wife's motorbike tyre for 7 years was still 'mobile'.

Yes ... given that you put a set amount of stuff in for each size of tyre then that would provide a 'thickness' of sealant over the complete surface and if it lost some at one point to seal that hole, the rest would move round to maintain the uniform thickness etc.
I think if you imagined it like a grease ... that would typically stay where you put it but would level off if you were to spin it round in something. Like if you put a blob in the bottom of a paint pail then span it round your head on a line, when you stopped it would probably be spread evenly over the bottom of the pail ... but wouldn't pour down to one side if you laid it on it's side? Make a hole in the grease with your finger, spin it round again and the hole will be gone. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 16-Jun-18 10:54 PM, T i m wrote:

As its a gel and self levels round the circumference of the tyre. How far up the tread of a motorbike tyre does it get?
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On Sat, 16 Jun 2018 23:53:14 +0100, Peter Hill

Good question and I think it would depend to some degree on the profile of the tyre and the dosage of sealant in the tyre.
Eg, The wife's bike is an XV750 'Virago' and the rear tyre particularly has a fairly wide / low profile (and the only treated bike tyre I've take off and taken notice of so far).
However, most tyres flex to form a 'contact patch' where they touch the road and as that moves about across the width of a bike tyre, so I believe the sealant spreads sideways slightly?
Plus, the chances are you were more likely to get a puncture in the bit that's touching the road?
The proof of the pudding is in the using and the lady from the BMW club that went round the world (on her old GS boxer) came back with a nearly bald rear tyre and several indicators where Ultraseal (as it was then) had fixed a few punctures (little purple dots on the rubber).
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-CaseStudy-Motorbike.pdf
Another big success story was a mate who was a gardener who used a ride on mower on one of his customers grounds. He was regularly having to take a wheel off and get punctures (mostly from hawthorns) fixed till I put him onto Ultraseal. His client went for it (and they were fairly big 'balloon tyres so the opposite of motorcycle tyres etc) and never suffered from a puncture again (and I believe they were tubed tyres as well).
When I first saw Ultraseal they had a motorcycle front wheel in a jig on their stand and were regularly stabbing it with a bradawl to demonstrate it's function. The 'signs' (purple dots) were all over the width of the tread area of the tyre but I had no idea how much sealant it had in there of course. I was happy if it just covered the main contact area (which on our touring bikes wasn't a radical as a track racer of course). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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As a point of interest, I had to replace two very expensive near new tyres due to screws close to the edge of the tread. So not repairable. My assumption being that sort of damage makes the tyre dangerous.
So how come some gunge made to seal a leak strengthens the tyre carcass to the point of safety?
Not a worry with a lawn mower. But you don't generally see them charging up the M1.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 17/06/2018 14:31, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That is one of my concerns re these sealants.
Having said that, the limit on where they can apply a normal repair is due to the process they can normally do in local tyre places. If you can find someone suitably equipped/qualified, they can repair outside the normal regions. It is all a matter of cost etc.
There is also the issue of the object doing further damage. The last puncture I had, in a new tyre on a car that had done only a few hundred miles from new!, was a Philips screw. It caused a slow leak and I was able to have it repaired before any real harm was done (the joys of tyre pressure warning systems). If I'd had used the sealing stuff, while it would have stopped the leak, the screw could have gone on to do more damage to the tyre.
The situation is, in my view, partly due to the policy of no longer having at least 'space saver' spare wheels. Our Smart Car didn't have one (although we've bought one), neither did the PHEV. Ditto my wife's previous car, a Picanto. While Tim is a fan of 'gunge', I'm not and prefer to have a spare wheel, even a space saver.
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