statistical distrubution mileage vs age?



The service history if on computer isn't available to a subsequent owner. A service book is all too easily altered or 'lost'. Just like the odometer.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 03/08/2015 11:08, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

There is a box on log book "15" that can be filled in when selling a car. "6" for transfer to a dealer. Bet they kick the side of your new car in for that.
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On 01/08/2015 19:49, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I did used to hear regular stories of clocking as the keepers tried to keep within contract mileage. Just overhearing in the pub type talk, but by all accounts it was trivial and cheap, and almost as routine as a service.

Some years back (late 90s), my brother bought a 3 year old 7 series with about 200,000 on the clock. Paid buttons at auction. Absolutely mint condition, with nothing I could see, down to the pedals, switchgear and seats, to indicate such high use. Very refined to drive with no rattles and everything seemed tight.
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The only things that really showed the milage on this E34 were a worn front seat, stoned chipped bonnet, and stone chipped windscreen. I replaced the seat covering (fabric) with a new BMW one - easy enough job which made it look like new. Replaced the screen too - as it was nightmare in the dark. The place that my dealer passed it on to had the bonnet resprayed, I'd guess. So the car looked like the 40,000 miles or so now on the odo.
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On Friday, July 31, 2015 at 8:36:09 PM UTC+8, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

US department of transport published a report in 2002 claiming that 3.5% of cars had tampered odometers. Since then most are electronic, but I suppose they can be hacked by those with the know-how.
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Where there's a will, there's a way. And it's a very easy way to add thousands to the 'value' of a car to the unwary. Ie 99% of used car buyers.
I'd guess those figures from the US are out by a factor of 10 or more in the UK.
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On 01/08/2015 09:40, snipped-for-privacy@topmail.co.nz wrote:

Probably even easier to hack.
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On 31/07/2015 02:08, snipped-for-privacy@topmail.co.nz wrote:

You have to turn the question around: A driver has a given mileage need, what car will he use for that?
I drive a lot on motorways, looking around me as I am bored, I'm surprised how new the other cars are. Cars from previous millennium are a rare sight. I wonder, what happened to those not-so new cars? My car is 1995 Saab, it's immaculate, quiet and refined. Admittedly, only get 35mpg. Most of the cars around me on motorway are diesels.
Form new car advertisements, diesels have almost become the default. Either that or tiny turbo engine, no more large engines.
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On Sat, 01 Aug 2015 09:31:05 +0100, johannes wrote:
[...]

There are a number of reasons for that.
More than 60% of new vehicles are purchased by companies. Their accountants have a responsibility to keep costs to a a minimum, and in most cases the cost per mile for a diesel doing high annual mileages in the first three years of ownership will be lower than an equivalent petrol vehicle.
Companies need to keep the emissions impact of their fleet low; again, a diesel is more likely to do this. In many cases, vans, and sometimes cars, are speed-restricted via the ECU to achieve further reductions. (This is going to cause 'amusement' for buyers along the line!)
The downside to all this is the particulate pollution our cities are suffering however.
Chris
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On 01/08/2015 09:31, johannes wrote:

The Bugatti Veyron.

The 2009 scrappage scheme.

The Chancellor may be changing that.
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On 01/08/2015 10:05, Nick Finnigan wrote:

Those who can only afford an older car were unlikely to have traded in a old car for new.
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On 01/08/2015 10:27, alan_m wrote:

There were many people with older, second cars that they had owned for a while, who could afford a new one.
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On 01/08/2015 10:05, Nick Finnigan wrote:

Yep, I completely forgot. A middle class gift from the guv picked from my hard earned Tax money...
So many perfectly nice cars were scrapped so that rich people could buy brand new cars. What a waste that was.
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Sampling bias. The cars you see on motorways are more likely to be the ones doing higher mileages. Older cars tend not to be driven as much, since they trickle down to people who don't have a need for as much motorway driving. While they do appear on motorways, you see less of them. So compare the motorway with the contents of Tesco's car park, and you might find more of the older cars at the latter.
It's also easier to distinguish 20th v 21st century cars via the registration so you make that distinction, while 10 years ago you might not have more obviously noticed the difference between (A-H) and (J-Y, 51-55) plates.
Theo
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On 02/08/2015 14:20, Theo Markettos wrote: So compare the

You may also have to choose the supermarket or you will get more sampling bias. My local Aldi car park appears to only cater for those who drive 1 to 3 year old 4x4s.
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On 02/08/2015 14:20, Theo Markettos wrote:

What I did was just an observation, for what's worth; not a scentific statistics. Although repeated patters interests me, what else can keep me amused on long motorway journeys. Then a cream coloured open top Jag XK120 roadster came along, what elegance, what beauty. Make me think how horrible the new generation of cars are looking. A Mercedes CLA makes me vomit at the sight. Perhaps it is the brutality of the shape which is the selling point? But brutality and beauty does not combine. Maybe I'm just getting old...
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A former teacher of mine told us that his then girlfriend would marry him if he had one of these. Well on his salary he couldn't manage that but after sometime he came into a small inheritance and then got the car and in turn got the girl..
Sting in the tail was within three years of being married she pissed of and left him for someone else and managed in the divorce proceedings to take the XK120 with her!..
Poor sod seemed to me he never quite got over that event!....
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Tony Sayer



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On 05/08/2015 10:26, tony sayer wrote:

A bloke I used to work with was a permanent bachelor, he had his own house and several classic cars that he kept in literally concours condition, nothing too fancy, but nice interesting cars that looked as they had in the showroom. He found love at about the age of 45, within a couple of years of marriage she had left, taking him for everything, the cars were all sold, along with the house and he was reduced to his racing bicycle and a pokey flat. Talk about a rinsing.
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You can see why fathers for justice get up to what they do;!(.
I don't think any young man with any capital assets should get married it's a minefield when it goes wrong.
The marriage clauses act needs a very bad overhaul but no government has the guts to touch it...
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Tony Sayer



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Different if kids are involved?
The above example suggests there were not.
But I do know a couple of no longer young women who were 'exchanged' for a newer model after bringing up the kids etc and didn't do well out of it. Might depend on how good a solicitor you have. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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