What is 'Oil Flush Treatment' apart from money-grabbing

This seems to appear on the list of itemised work done on three garages that I have used in recent years.
Neighbour who used to have his own backstreet car
repair and MOT business just smirked, and said that it's how you sting the punter for another £10 for doing nothing.
Has anyone else noticed this on their garage invoice ?.
Andrew
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On 23/08/2018 19:41, Andrew wrote:

Why have you paid for it?
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MrCheerful wrote:

Well, my garage which I have used for 10 years charges ?6 for one oil flush. I dunno what he actually does. But he has looked after me for 10 years. He came out to me and my sick wife when the car broke down. I trust him.
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On 24/08/2018 15:30, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

but you are not questioning it and are presumably happy with being charged for it, the OP has paid it, yet is clearly unhappy to have paid it, yet has not questioned it with the places that charged it!
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MrCheerful wrote:

I don't know what an oil flush actually is. ????? My days of crawling under cars have long gone. I'm too bloody old for that sort of thing.
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On Fri, 24 Aug 2018 19:06:36 +0100, "Mr Pounder Esquire"
Isn't it just a lighter / thinner / cheaper(?) oil that is really only used for flushing the engine out, after say a rebuild or big service?
You replace the old oil with it, run the engine gently up to temp and the drain and fill with proper oil?
Cheers, T i m
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On 24/08/2018 19:35, T i m wrote:

That is one type.
There is also a type you add, I assume some kind of 'cleaning agent', to the old oil.
On YouTube, people use various things- I'm not sure I'd trust.
While it could be because I tend to keep my engines 'clean', I'm dubious how much 'gunge' a short flush would remove going by the fact that when I change my oil, it still looks clean for some time- weeks at at least- so it isn't absorbing any muck left in the engine.
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On 24/08/2018 19:35, T i m wrote:

Wouldn't filling an engine with 4 to 5 litres of flushing oil cost more than £10 especially when considering the labour costs for anpther fill and drain? To be effective it may also need a replacement oil filter for the flush which is discarded once the flush oil is drained. This is assuming that an aggressive cleaning (thin) oil doesn't damage the engine while its being run.
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On 24/08/2018 20:14, alan_m wrote:

Running the engine in the garage, at low revs, with no load, for long enough to warm up the flushing oil etc, isn't likely to do much harm- certainly if balanced against the removal of any 'gunge' in the case of a dirty engine.
Whether such a short period is enough to be effective is another question- at least if the flushing oil doesn't have some good solvent properties.
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On 25/08/2018 08:10, Brian Reay wrote:

It may well loosen some flakes of crud from the inner surfaces of the engine which can then clog the oil strainer, leading to starvation of oil pressure and a wrecked engine (this was quite a common fault on early cvh engines)
Regular oil changes as per maker's schedule using good quality oil is the correct solution.
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In one.
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I reckon that I wrecked my MK2 Escort engine doing something similar - ie adding a 'highly recommended' anti-sludging additive to the engine oil. Soon afterwards, when driving happily along, the engine suddenly started sounding like a ratting can of nails. Leaving it for a minute or two before continuing usually cleared the problem for a short while (especially if I drove slowly). I suspected an oil blockage, but getting the local garage to blow out the oilways didn't cure it. I think there was possibly a flap of partially released sludge somewhere, and that it would keep getting sucked up and blocking something. Since then, I feel it's usually better to 'let sleeping dogs lie'.
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On 29/08/2018 10:19, Ian Jackson wrote:

The coarse filter in the sump can sometimes give you warning of inpending doom by putting the oil light on when too many flakes bolck the sump filter, you turn the engine off, the flakes fall off and away you go, for a while.
I found that the crossflow pumps were quite susceptible to sludging up internally and I saw several engines wrecked by this. Happily changing the oil pump was easy on that engine, but usually came too late, I have an idea there are still a couple of new pumps in the garage, should go on ebay, anything for early escort sells.
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On 25/08/2018 10:15, MrCheerful wrote:

Indeed, that has always been my philosophy and was the advice from my trusted mechanic when I mentioned flushing to him some years back out of curiosity.
I've wondered about the 'draining' of oil by sucking it out of the dipstick tube. Doesn't seem like a good idea to me.
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Short of stripping an engine down, you can't get rid of all old oil by draining it anyway. If a car is serviced properly, the oil is changed long before it degrades to any significant degree. That can be proved by having it tested.
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On 25/08/2018 15:24, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I must admit, we rarely do the number of miles specified for a service these days- the services are done on time- so that is certainly true on our case.
Having said that, I know someone who insists he never changes his oil, just tops it up. Last time I saw him, he had one VERY old vehicle (a diesel) which was still going, although not used every day.
I think he tended to change his other vehicles every few years, and they tended to be bought s/h.
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IIRC (but I might be wrong), some time ago there was a test using a fleet of taxis in Prague. At the normal service intervals, some had new oil and oil filter, some had only new oil, and some had only a new filter. It was found that there was least wear and tear in the engines, and generally higher reliability, with those that only had a new filter.
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On 25/08/2018 20:40, Brian Reay wrote:

Back in the early nineties, I worked for West Midlands Fire service, fixing radios, turnout equipment, and computers.
They had fleet of H-plate Astramax vans with the 1.7L non-turbo diesel engine. The manufacturers oil change interval was something daft like 4500 miles IIRC (when a petrol was 9000).
As you might expect, the vehicle workshops did the servicing, rather than sending it to a dealer, and they generally did it on a time basis. This was fine for all the station vans that did very few miles- hydrant inspections, chippy runs, moving the odd bit of kit to another station etc.
Our van, however, was in use pretty much all day every day, and often at night as well, driving over the entire county, heavily laden, and mercilessly thrashed. We were based in central Birmingham, covered from NW Wolverhampton to SE Coventry, and one guy lived in Telford, so it racked up the miles at a huge rate, and thanks to the schedule, only one or two oil changes in ~60k miles IIRC. It got checked/topped up regularly, at least once a week at on-call handover.
It gradually got more rattly (bearing inn mind that as a early 90s GM diesel, it was never quiet), and felt slower. Cam follower noise. One Friday afternoon, it was my turn on call, and I took the van home. Within a few yards of home, a nasty clunk, and the engine died. Managed to coast it to my house, and it got recovered. The camshaft had seized, and broken up. It ended up with a new cylinder head, but was never the same again. Our next van got serviced a lot more....
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If you've ever cleaned the insides of an old engine, you'd realise it can't be done with another oil. You get a build up of burnt on deposits that take some shifting. But actually don't do any harm, provided the oil has been changed correctly and on time.
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On Sat, 25 Aug 2018 11:21:42 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

Ok. What-if <devils-advocate etc> ... you drained your oil, added a flushing oil (and assuming it had greater solvent abilities than a straight oil), ran it up for a while, drained again and got out more dirty oil than was just left over from the initial drain?

But it's not about 'flushing' that sort of thing is it? It's supposed to move more old oil and sludge than a conventional oil (change) would?
Cheers, T i m
p.s. A motorbike I was working on for daughters friend recently leaked some petrol into the sump. It was run (slowly) with this very mild petrol to oil mix ... so do you think this 'oil' would have flushed any gunge out or not?
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