Don't buy Delco sound systems!

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I just fired this letter off to GM, after purchasing the $600 Delco/Bose option for my new Silverado.
I bought the Delco/Bose sound system in my new Silverado - a $600 option. I
noticed that when playing CD-R disks, playback was normal until the player warmed up, and then would begin skipping. I contacted my dealer, who advised me to contact GM. I just got off the phone with the GM representative.
He tells me that this behavior is "normal" for this player, and is documented in the owner's manual. Of course, I had already taken delivery of the vehicle by the time I had access to the owner's manual, but that is really beside the point.
I have 3 computers with CD players, 2 other cars, 2 stereos, 2 boomboxes, and 3 portable CD players. That is 12 CD players that have no problem playing CD-R disks. If you were to include my previous vehicles, the count would be higher.
In the year 2004, for GM to accept that their CD players are incapable of playing CD-R disks is unacceptable. To sell an optional sound system for $600 with the knowledge that it won't perform the same task as a $19.95 portable diskman is ludicrous. Now I have to spend $300+ dollars at a stereo shop to remove the factory player and put a decent one in.
When I was growing up, my mother and father always had Oldsmobiles and Cadillacs, respectively. My last GM purchase before purchasing this truck was a 1972 Chevy Nova, 31 years ago. But I like the Silverado; I like the way it drives, and I've heard good things about GM quality for the last few years. My purchase decision came down to the Toyota Tundra or the Silverado and I chose the Silverado. But not again. Toyota would fix this sort of problem, not just document it in their owner's manual. As long as GM finds it acceptable for ANY part of their product to be sub-par, the ENTIRE product will be sub-par.
In June, I will be selling my car and buying a new one. Guess what brand I won't even consider?
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RickB wrote:

I thought that this was common knowledge - that a simple Kenwood stereo will beat a GM or Ford or Chrysler or Volvo or.. factory stereo. The only ones I see that are close in quality are on the new Toyotas and Hondas(aside from the high-end luxury brands like Infinity and BMW)
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I had a factory equipped sound system with CD player (Infinity ??) in my 1989 T-Bird SC that worked and sounded great - even going over rough streets .
You'd think the auto makers would have them perfected by now.
Joseph Oberlander wrote:

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CD-R disks are not reliable in any auto CD player. If one type doesn't work try another. It could also be your writer not having a strong enough write signal. Try some different disks and if available a different writer......

streets
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"CD-R disks are not reliable in any auto CD player". I guess you're right. Except for the Ford Ranger I traded in. And my wife's VW. And my buddy's Toyota. And my BMW. And the Mazda we traded in. And, and, and.
I repeat; I was charged $600 extra for a "premium" sound system. If GM wants to compete, they can't excuse themselves by saying "everyone knows our audio sucks. If you want good audio, buy Japanese".

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Hmmmmm - I use CDR's and CDR/W's in my '02 Impala without any problems. If you put stick-on labels on them - don't. Also, don't buy the EL-cheapo disks because they are notorious for problems (stick with good brand names) because sometimes a bargain is only a bargain at the register. Not all CD's are compatible with all CD players (just read the info with any good CD burner).
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Didn't have a problem with my 99 sunfire, or my 03 monte carlo (I put in aftermarket decks in each of them, but only to add MP3 playback.
Try to burn the disk at a slower speed, 1x-2x is good for CD-A, if you burn a disk too fast it makes it harder for the reader to read, expecially if the CD writer is on its way out.

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Paradox wrote:

I'll concur with that.. I was very unhappy with CD-Rs in my car until a professional sound engineer suggested I burn them at a slower speed. That cured the skip problem...
Jim
--
Jim Everman mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Anet-STL.com
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Burning them at a slower speed sounds like a good idea, I think that I'll start doing that - just for insurance. I currently burn my disks at 38x because all my disks are name brand and certified to 40x or 48x. I've found that you can get good deals on disks at the office supply stores so I stock up when they're on sale (I currently have 300 CDR blanks on hand) but I never use CDRW due to the fact that they're too finicky (and once I burn a disk, it's done period!). BTW, Radio Shack has a special till 12/24 on 50 Phillips CDR's for $4.99 (after a $15 mail-in rebate). Also, Office Depot has a buy one-get-one-free sale on a 50-pack of Maxell CDR's ($19.95).
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On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:35:05 -0500 (EST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Rich B) wrote:

The media to look for is Taiyo Yuden. It's the actual manufacturer, other companies put their name on them. I use Fuji branded ones, they're labeled as 32X, will burn at 40X and work GREAT in my 4 year old Sony CD deck in my truck. The Fujis that are Taiyo Yuden are the blue wrapped spindles that are made in Japan.
Or, search for Taiyo Yuden on Yahoo Shopping, you'll find un-branded ones for $28/100 spindle.
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Rich B wrote:

Burning speed makes little difference. To play reliably, I have to extract the tracts and re-burn them as standard audio files. A clone-CD operation will not work. Going over 640MB wont either. Burn speed at 4x or 8x. This is burner dependant. My 24X burner only does 4x reliably, but that's true for everything I burn(go fig), so it's not an audio problem. Setting your burner to max speed WILL cause problems. The speeds they claim are advertizing and not reality.
I use Verbatum or similar CD-Rs and it works fine. The trick is to find ones that are as close to silver in color as possible. Greenish ones (dark) are junk in most older players. Best so far - Verbatim Data Life 700mb. bought 50 cds - not one coaster.
Using this technique, I've never had a CD I burned fail to work in even ten year old players that date from before CD Burners were around.
P.S. - CD-Rs last a few months in a typical CD changer at best, (scratches/wear/etc) so don't expect miracles.
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I agree with you on the silver color. My SIL is a computer guru and he has learned by experimentation that the branded silver tend to have a very low failure rate. When I installed my Sony burner, he told me to buy Maxell silver and I've run through hundreds without a failure. I've only burned audio and data files on them (no MP3 or MP3 pro) so I can't vouch for anything else. My drive is rated at 52x but the highest I've ever used is 38x. I have a couple thousand LP's 45's and 78's (I collect them for fun only) and I'm currently using the Musicmatch jukebox plus program and the Clean Ultra program to edit them and put them onto CD. With all the work I do on those audio files, I can't afford to have a lot of failures.
As far as them lasting only a few months, mine last much longer, even the ones used in the car and they tend to be played repeatedly for weeks at a time. I do, however, burn a master of any made from LP's and these are used to make "play" copies (I do the same with all my tapes, too). I run my CD's through numerous brands and types of CD players and have found only a couple that have problems with them (and they tend to have problems with some commercial CD's too).
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I have an '02 Impala and I have different results. The cd player skips quite frequently on CDR's whereas my Cavalier I owned before never skipped once. Also the sound on my '02 is awful. The bass is so high that I cannot use any of the presets that come with the premium sound. I believe this is a flaw with certain Impala radios from doing research on the internet.
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net says...

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RickB wrote:

fwiw, the Monsoon/Delco in my 2001 Trans Am plays CDR's just fine. Doesn't do RW disks tho. I've found the slower the burn, the better the skip resistance. Applies to my stock radio, the wife's beretta (Alpine) and my Jimmy (Kenwood) cd players.
Ray
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I know the feeling. Actually, the one in my 96 Regal worked ok for four years before it began this skipping behavior after it heated up. Wait until it starts trying to eject then eat the disc. It will do that too... eventually. Mine actually played my CDRs with no more problem than it played regular CDs as long as you record them in .wav format. Good thing I like AM Radio anyway (yes the FM still works). Good Luck Liz

I
count
the
few
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finds
I
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Hate to tell you this but you cannot "just remove the factory player and replace it with aftermarket" You do that and your truck won't even start. It is connected to the data bus and the computer uses it to generate the various chimes, and a few other things also.
My father just got his new Silverado and has the same problems, he tried a few different brands of CD-Rs and in his I think it was black CD-Rs from Teac or TDK (forget but they were black, that worked good and didn't skip. I believe the problem is that the laser has problems with the reflectivity on a silver disc.
--
Steve


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No, it won't cause the vehicle not to start. The only reasons for the data bus connection are for the anti-theft function of the radio, which prevents it from working in another vehicle, and on some vehicles, the radio generates the chimes. The last part is something of a pain when replacing the radio, but you can get an aftermarket module that connects into the wiring harness and replaces that function.
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Are you sure Bob? I can program a lot of the interior lighting, door lock, etc. functions through the radio in my '02 Impala. I've heard that you can adapt other radios but you lose certain functions in the vehicle.
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I'd really like to know whos propogating that rumor... the worse it does is kill the door chime, and make it so your oil change light doesnt turn on. If you have OnStar then that will get disabled. In which case just relocate the radio to the trunk/under a seat with a Metra wiring kit.

Thats the worst reason to not buy a chevy I think I've ever seen.
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One writer has the correct response. CDRs vary significantly in quality. Do a search on the net about this. Among the best of CDRs is Fuji. Also, the quality of the CDR/W drive is another important point in the performance chain, as well as burn speed. Aftermarket? Guess what, the components are pretty much from a small set of manufacturers, so buying an aftermarket unit will essentially get you a different faceplate. Some more capable, some less, and some with better specs, but overall the factory unit is more durable, and has better ergonomics. So please try to understand that you may have to do some experimentation to find the right set of CDRs, software, and hardware for the performance you require.
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