OT-Fair Warning

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You probably have cable internet, Budd... DSL is dependent on a phone line and is usually 1/3 to 1/2 the speed of cable..
I've been on cable for about 5 years now and would never give it up, even if I didn't need it for work... I had to use the (yuk) modem in my laptop the other day and it was like trying to swim through Jello, compared to "broadband"...
BTW: welcome to broadband... you'll love it!
mac
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Already do love it, my friend. But I found out my 4 year old copy of Norton doesn't like XP too well, so I got AVG. <VBG> Budd
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Budd Cochran wrote:

I believe the difference is this. Cable Internet is through cable TV lines. DSL is through digital phone lines.
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Ok, I think I understand, but why does the cable company call it "DSL"? Just to give a sort of comparison to phone DSL? My bro-in-law has phone DSL and he thinks my connection is faster.
Budd
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Yep.. cable is usually about twice as fast as DSl, when both are the "high speed" option... The cable here is only available at high speed, but some areas have slower cable speeds for less monthly fee..
I think DSL has a few speeds available, too, but not sure..
mac
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ADSL (which is what is typically used for consumer-grade service) can go up to 8Mbps in one direction, and 1Mbps in the other. Newer implementations can achieve up to 12Mbps, depending on the distance the signal needs to travel, condition of the lines, etc. I've seen services offered from 768K/128K (for $15/month) up to 7Mb/1Mb (probably in the $70-$80/month range).
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big
but
Budd, both mac and miles answered your question correctly. You have cable.
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Please indicate exactly what cable modem or cable company uses band pass filters.
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TBone wrote:

Cox has in the past.
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Where were they connected and what purpose did they serve? Not calling you a liar, just curious.
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TBone wrote:

The TV cable enters a room and connects to a splitter. On the output to the cable modem a filter is put in place. Something about cross interference between the cable modem and TV line to the rest of the neighborhood.
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Yeah, now that you mention it, they (AT&T, now Comcast) put a filter inline under the house when we had problems with cable internet...
mac
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Bandpass filters are used in many R.F. systems to isolate and/or restrict interference. Back in the 70's we could get AM/FM/CB radio antennas for our vehicles that had pretty large filters to prevent the CB from overdriving the detector / first amp stages of your AM radio.
But they often failed when some clown would drive a kilowatt thru them instead of the legal 4 watts of CB output.
Budd (aka, Canon City Boogieman, KBH-4658)
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Tom,
You're challenging the wrong guy and the cable internet installer called them band pass filters. That's all I know about it.
Down, boy, down.
Budd
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LOL, no challenge intended. Just curious as to what type of filters were being used. When I had DSL, I had them on my phones to block the DSL carrier signal and have never seen any filters on any of my cable connections.
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TBone wrote:

They installed filters (two of them) on my cable system back in 98 when I first got it.
Jerry
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Ok. Thanks to all.
Budd
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Like Tom said, if you are connecting your modem through a telephone jack, then you have a DSL modem and if it is connected by a coax connection, then it is a cable modem. Where exactly are those band pass filters connected. That sounds a lot like a DSL setup if they are connected to your telephones.
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